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20110701
20110731
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
in addition of karzai's brother's assassination, it is still the same thing. >>shepard: the taliban are still, in large part, with their judicial system on wheels, and still have much in control in many places? >>guest: yes, but the taliban is shifting. they are trying to get back into power but, at the same time, the north has form add new political alliance that will never let the taliban rule so we are headed for a divisive period in politics over the next two or three years. >>shepard: what is your sense as this wraps up, what might have been accomplished? >>guest: we have shifted afghanistan toward america's values and ideas and when you go to kabul or kandahar and walk around people feel like they are part of the world and no longer buried in a draconian regime. we have done an amazing amount of good work with the infrastructure projects. but we took that country from zero to 60 in 10 years so you will see a lot, a lot, a lot of fighting and infighting, as well, much like when the russians left. people will make grabs for power in the power vacuum. so both good and bad. >>shepard: we're
once again become a haven for al-qaeda should the taliban ever return to power there. that is according to the top u.s. commander in afghanistan general david petraeus. as you may know, later this month general petraeus will be stepping down from his role to head the cia and in an interview with fox the general said the military has had a lot of success eradicating militants but cautioned that the job is not over. >> that task has been accomplished but, of course, it is threatened because, of course, the taliban allowed al-qaeda on afghan soil when it ran the country and we believe that there is a high likelihood that that would happen again. >> the general has also said that the military focus will soon shift from taliban strongholds to the boarder with pakistan. >>> capture or kill. that reportedly is the question the obama administration is internally debating when it comes to what to do about wanted terrorists. we all know capturing suspects in the mountains of pakistan or in yemen is not easy and if the recent uptick in predator drone strikes is any indication it appears the white
by the taliban. this reflects assistmatic policy of the taliban and their isi handlers, the intelligence organization is i think behind this as well. and also al-qaeda. this policy is a tool to eliminate real and potential enemies of the islamists they want to reimplant back in cob he will. >> so this is a blow to the u.s. in afghanistan? >> yes, and also the destabilization. it's another example of pakistan interference in this area. the senior of military commander, a marine general, told the minnesota media last week that the pakistanis have still not severed the taliban supply lines coming in from pakistan. >> so many were aware of them and what they were up to when bin laden in was captured and they think wow, did they know about this, were they shielding them. now they are cutting off $800 million s that the right move? >> yes, it is certainly the right move. we should have done is before, ten years late. we should have conditioned the aid and especially the military aid long ago. we should also take other steps. >> like what? >> in 1993 secretary of state baker sent aler to the pa
it is threatened, because of course the taliban allowed al-qaida on afghan soil when it ran the country, and we believe that there is a high likelihood that that would happen again. >> reporter: also, he pointed out that there will be ahift in the focus of the battle here in the coming months, moving from the south up to the east. they are sending in more special forces to the east where we're seeing taliban militants come over from pakistan. they are going to send in more helicopters and they are going to send some more heavy equipment. he was trying to say this wasn't a change in strategy, more a realignment of troops. the taliban was kicked out of the east and they are trying to get back. he said from this point on that will be the focus. when he joins the cia he will have to deal with the problem that is pakistan itself. relations are at an all time low between the two countries. he didn't appear to have a clear strategy of how he is going to do that. that will be his number one job and task when he gets back to washington. >> reporter: from one come phra indicate job he goes to another. th
here. >> that's my question. can pakistan's military take on the taliban and militancy without u.s. money and resources, reza? >> reporter: well, look. they have a big army. 600,000 soldiers. it's one of the biggest armies of the world. they are not the best trained army, not the most proficient when it comes to fighting and insurgency. fighting that the taliban, that they've needed the help of the u.s. in the past, but, again, they're saying they don't need the help anymore. they're going to continue to fight without the u.s.' help. but it doesn't square with previous statements made in the past. previous demands for the u.s. to give them more money, give them resources, claims that they need help. now they say they don't need help. i think this is gamesmanship and i think all of this really underscores a troubled relationship, but i think what's important to point out is though the relationship is hurting there is no indication that it will end. both countries realize that they need one another so i think there are indications that it will stagger forward despite the troubles.
an eye on in the newsroom. the taliban claiming the responsibility for the assassination of hamid karzai's half brother. he was gunned down at his heavily guarded home in kandahar. russia opening up a criminal negligence investigation into the deadly sinking of a cruise ship. the boat was apparently overloaded at the time of the accident. 88 people now confirmed dead, another 41 still missing. hopes for finding them alive are fading today. and just days after a stun gun was found on a jetblue flight from boston to newark a lufthansa passenger is busted at jfk airport trying to board a plain with two stun guns stashed in his luggage. greg: brand-new developments in the gop race for the white house in 2012. tea party favorite michelle bachman seems to be making substantial gains. take a look at this. in a poll conducted by a republican pollster bachman is the frontrunner in iowa, the state that holds the first caucus leading mitt romney 25-21%. while mitt romney leads in new hampshire take a look at bachman, she is surging into second-place jumping 8 percentage points in one month alone. j
the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's northwest in tribal areas. he also admits there was some skepticism about what help they are getting from pakistan after they killed osama bin laden last month. he did say that in the past pakistan has helped them track down some of the al-qaeda leadership. >> heather: thank you very much, david piper streaming live from afghanistan. >> gregg: are we really in reach of defeating al-qaeda? is the road to victory as simply as taking out the top 20 leaders. joining me now is senior advisor and principal of international advis
.s. troops open next year. panetta also said he hopes the taliban will be on the run. it is key they keep up the pressure now. >>> and panetta also said the leaders such as al-qaida chief al-zawahri is, to limit their ability . also he believes that al-zawahri may be over the border in pakistan's northwestern federally administered tribal area. the defense secretary will have to deal with tense relations with pakistan following the killing of osama bin laden there. he said there was efforts to help them in the hunt for al-qaida members. but he said they have helped in the past track some of them down. back to you. >> david, in kabul. >> political sacrifices are needed on both sides of the aisle to solve the budget critesis. will democrats and republicans move past the rhetoric when they sit down in the white house tomorrow. >> hi, to you john. goal to whack four trillion off of the deficit over 10 years. president obama emphasized the positive. >>ed -- the good news is, we agree on the big thingings. after racking up deficit debts we need to get our fiscal house in order. both sides are goin
insurgents and top leaders, many taliban, but several of them arabs linked to al qaeda, damaging their network. yet, the clashes reveal that al qaeda, for years, said to be mostly across the border in pakistan is again a concern back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we push down into the valley, still an insurgent stronghold. high-tech american helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them up in the valley. >> uncharacteristic for the taliban around here. they are getting gutsy. past there usually patrols don't push up far past that because if you do, you're going to take enemy contact, pretty certain. >> reporter: the afghans clear about who lay and wait for them ahead. [ speaking in foreign language ] >> translator: they are talibans and arabs and poickets there. >> reporter: the foot of the valley, the american base is hit by pot shots sometimes by lone gunmen up high who they then mortar. al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making it harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network that made america's case for
. the threat is not from the taliban, but apparently from their own government . >> he held me like this. >> it happened in seconds. >> where did they hit you. >> punches to the gut from four attacks. a few baton whacks and the kicks to the body. >> i was thinking about -- that i'm going to die today. >> the victim of the attack was the pakistani journalist. his attackers were not street thugs they had police uniforms on and pulled him over. >> they said if you want to be a hero, we will make you a hero. >> and an example. >> it's not clear who roughed him up, but he is feeting over a string of attacks against journalists that raised a troubling question. are the spy agents? they told the british paper, the guardian he was kidnapped and beaten after he wrote a report about illegal arrests by intelligence agencies, whoever beat him a second time didn't like that they made him look bad. >> the last time, they threatened to wrap my body. under these circumstances, what can i do? >> his beating came less than three weeks after the still unsolved murder of another pakistani journalist. for ye
projectiles to militias in iraq and giving long range rockets to the taliban in afghanistan. >> heather: nato ramming up airstrikes in libya largely under gadhafi's control. rebels claim they are gaining ground and pushing towards the capital. the u.s. is dismissing gadhafi's threats of attacks on europe if flay toe's -- if nato's military intervention does not stop. >> reporter: those retaliatory strikes a not happen in , but they are happening against the rebels' stronghold here in misrata. overnight we had rockets land six miles from where we are now many they were aimed at the port, a key part of the city. a city under seen. the only supplies come in via ship. the residents who are under seen have begun to take stock of what their city looks like. there is now a deadly silence on what was misrata's main drag. people walk through the rubble, survey the damage and see what little is left. >> we come back to see our houses, we found them destroyed. all things stolen. >> reporter: in the shadow of collapsed buildings crews work to pull new telephone cables and repair the destroyed intrastruct
problem is not india, it's in pakistan and the taliban and terrorist attacks about you. the pakistanis always say, no, no it's india. who you worry about, jon, whoever's fault this is, this will increase tension between india and pakistan and those are two countries who have nuclear weapons. jon: we are looking from the state ride indian television. they are reporting eight people killed. that's what our viewers are seeing on the screen. this comes on the heels of the assassination of president karzai's brother in afghanistan. any likely correction there? >> reporter: not clear. i rather doubt it, although this is a part of the world where two weeks ago we saw an attack on the intercontinental poe tell in kabul. this is a part of the world that is boiling up again, whether it's in afghanistan, pakistan, whether it's potentially in india. those three countries are all linked. the indians have ties in afghanistan. the pakistanis are worried that the indians are going to make inch roads into pakistan and afghanistan as the united states leaves the region. so, again, it's too soon to make
extraordinary. toppling the taliban. training afghan forces. putting al qaeda under unprecedented pressure, killing osama bin laden. our troops have battled a brutal insurgency, given the iraqi people an opportunity for a better future. it is in their hands. although it does not always make the headlines, every day our forces are serving with distinction in far-flung corners of the world, from western europe to east asia, faced with relentless adversaries. our troops have proven themselves, proven to be a generation of not only warriors but innovators, led by men like admiral mullen, who i have always respected. as i have worked with him every day, i have grown to respect him even more for what he has done. the master new languages, develop and employ advanced new technologies. they have taken on responsibilities once reserved for colonels and generals. the responsibility has extended beyond the battlefield. i was talking with my good buddy two days ago. it is astounding what you guys have trained these young men and women to do. they not only have to be warriors. they have to be politicia
's history for the the taliban as is for any iraqi insurgency grew. so i think they now have an internal sort of safe haven. a lot of our folks, but i like to think sometimes there are areas that have no violence. that doesn't mean al qaeda doesn't control, they control so thoroughly that there is no violence. so i think we need to look at some of the other provinces, there is an absence of violence. it doesn't mean violence is absent, if you will. i think that everything they really need right now to plan, to fund anti-recruit. the internet makes it easy for them to influence which they have done repeatedly. >> so you would say whether it's comparing out of six months ago or even a year ago, you would say that aqap's capacity to launch an attack, a strike on our homeland has been enhanced as opposed to the greatest? >> their capacity to do so has been increased. we, of course, have responded to the various attacks and more preventive measures and in some cases going after them. but with an embassy that is on lockdown, on reduced many, we are not completely blind but we very much are operatin
15 others. the taliban claims responsibility but remains quiet on this mosque attack. karzai was a high-ranking official in kandahar's government, also considered one of the most powerful men in southern afghanistan. health let's well, a 6-year-old girl from illinois tees her way right into the record book by sinking a hole in one. reagan kennedy becoming the youngest golfer ever to hit a hole in one since the links at ireland grove opened some five years ago. and reagan kennedy, she joins us now by phone with her dad, steve kennedy also on the line. hi, steve, hi, reagan. >> hi, heather, how are you? heather: doing fine. how are you doing? >> we're doing well. heather: so, reagan, how surprised were you that you hit this hole in one? >> very surprised. heather: could you see the ball actually go in? i know it was, what, 85 yards. could you see it go in? >> no. heather: and what did you do right after you hit the hole in one? >> walked back to the cart. heather: so you walked back to the cart, and from what i understand your 13-year-old sister was sitting there, but you were
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)